Monthly Archives: October 2012

Your Weekly Consumption Guidelines

Bookmark this post. Print it and keep it in your wallet. If you’re all about enjoying alcohol but maintaining good health, then read on.

 

From time to time our government puts out guidelines for alcohol consumption – but who wants to go through tables and tables of data? We’ve put together for your a sweet little infographic to summarise the guidelines for you.

 

Weekly Alcohol Consumption Guidelines

Here it is in summary (numbers are inclusive):

Males:

Drink up to 4 drinks per week for low long term risk

Drink up to 6 drinks per week for moderate long term risk

Drink up to 10 drinks per week but cop a high long term risk

 

Drink up to 6 drinks per week for low short term risk

Drink up to 10 drinks per week for moderate short term risk

Drink 11+ drinks per week but cop a high short term risk

 

Females:

Drink up to 2 drinks per week for low long term risk

Drink up to 7 drinks per week for moderate long term risk

Drink up to 10 drinks per week but cop a high long term risk

 

Drink up to 5 drinks per week for low short term risk

Drink up to 10 drinks per week for moderate short term risk

Drink 10+ drinks per week but cop a high short term risk

 

Remember to enjoy alcohol safely! That’s all from QLD Cheers this week.

Cheers!

 

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All you need to know for Schoolies!

We would be amiss if we didn’t address the topic that’s most likely going through most of your minds in these late months of the year – Schoolies. If you’re planning to take part in the event as a Schoolie (or a Toolie!), there are some things you should know beforehand in order to make the most out of your celebrations. We’ve gathered a list of tips from some of the national schoolies websites in Australia to give you a bit of a head-start! Don’t worry, we’ll try and keep it short – we know you don’t like to read ;).

Getting Organised:

  • WHO will you go with?
    • It’s always best to travel with people you know and trust!
    • A larger group can bring down costs per person
  • WHAT will you do?
    • How long are you planning to stay?
    • Is everyone in your group over 18? Are there things to do for those who aren’t?
  • WHEN will you go?
    • Time your schoolies trip so you don’t miss any extra requirements for tertiary course entry. Lots of universities and TAFEs set interviews, auditions or entrance tests around this time of year.
  • WHERE will you stay?
    • Schoolies accommodation gets booked out fast so get onto this as soon as you can!
    • Hotels, motels, resorts, units/house, caravans, and campsites are all options
  • HOW will you get there?
    • Public transport, driving? Plan your route ahead of time.

Accommodation:

  • Prepare a budget so you’ll know how much you can afford to spend on accommodation and save enough money for other things like food, transport and having fun.
  • Know your rights and responsibilities when renting accommodation, especially with things like bonds, repairs and cancellations. Ask to see and read the ‘house rules’ before signing anything.
  • Keep your cash and other valuables in a safe place. If you choose to leave the door open, keep an eye on who is coming and going.
  • Be a good tenant. Leave your room, apartment or campsite in the state you found it. Report any breakages or damage and be prepared to pay reasonable compensation to the owner, if necessary.

Safe Partying:

  • Remember you don’t have to drink alcohol to have fun!
  • Know the liquor laws in the state where you’re holidaying.
  • If you’re over 18 years old, organise a driver’s licence, passport or proof of age card.
  • Avoid drinking in rounds and know your limits.
  • If you’re drinking, stay with people you know and trust.
  • DO NOT drink and drive.
  • If you think your drink has been spiked, tell a friend, bar or security staff, or the police.
  • If you think you’ve been sexually assaulted, tell a friend or family member, and go to a doctor or hospital.
  • Don’t accept drinks from strangers.
  • Don’t drink something you did not open, or see opened or poured.
  • If you’re unsure about your drink, leave it.
  • Remember no drug use is safe.
  • If you take drugs, tell someone else what you are taking in case you become sick or unconscious.

Disputes and Violence:

  • Stay cool when trying to resolve a dispute, whether with a bar staff, security staff or whoever. Being polite and courteous goes a long way to getting your problem solved.
  • Organise a ‘safe place’ where you and your friends can meet up if you feel threatened.
  • If a fight breaks out then move out of the area as quick as you can.
  • If someone’s threatening you or has assaulted you in any way, call the police on 000 immediately.
  • Travel in groups and always look out for each other. Don’t go out alone and stick to well-lit streets.
  • Report any assault, no matter how minor, to the police.
  • Accept the fact that conflicts and disputes will inevitably arise when you are living closely with friends and sharing your space. Often a bit of ‘time out’ will help clear the air when there’s been a disagreement.

You can read these and many other great tips on the Youth Central Website for Schoolies.  There are also some great resources and advice available through the following sites:

We know it’s a lot to take in, but if it helps you or someone you know avoid an unfriendly situation then it’s worth every second spent. We hope you enjoy your schoolies week – it will be one of the most exciting weeks of your life! Keep safe, be responsible, and have FUN!

Cheers!!

 

 


Experiences with Alcohol (Interview)

This week we interviewed a member of the community who been visiting our blog for the last few weeks and wanted to talk to us about their own experiences.  We asked them a few questions about their experiences with alcohol and peer pressure, as well as their thoughts on what they could have done differently when they were drinking.

 

Here’s a recap of our interview!

 

Q. First off, how old are you?

A. I’m 22 years old.

Q. How often do you drink alcohol?

A. I actually used to drink a lot more alcohol than I do now.  I used to be one of those guys who go out every weekend, I went clubbing and such all the time but now I’m more of a casual drinker – I don’t know the exact term, is it social drinker? I don’t know, I really only drink, and in low to moderate amounts, when I’m with friends and family in a social gathering or party now – I wouldn’t say I really go to any raging parties though.

Q. Is there anything in particular that contributed to this decline in drinking that you want to mention?

A. I think I just kind of realised that I was spending all my money on making myself sick to be honest, haha.  I had a few slightly scary incidents that did help to put me off drinking a little; I do know of someone close to me that was hospitalised after a pretty horrible case of alcohol poisoning.  They were okay in the end but it was a pretty scary situation for a bit there.

Q. Is alcohol poisoning something you’ve ever suffered from yourself?

A. Not in such an extreme way, but I have definitely been in the situation where I have had far too much to drink and completely lost track of what I was doing, and I think that any situation where you don’t have complete control of what you’re doing can potentially put both you and those around you in danger – and that’s something that is scary to me.

Q. Did you drink when you were underage?

A. Yes, I definitely drank illegally far too often and from quite a young age.

Q. What sort of impact do you think that had on your life, if any?

A. I think it really kind of numbed me to the effects that alcohol could have on people from early on – it was something that everyone was doing and I just joined in with the group.

Q. So peer pressure had a lot to do with your decisions?

A. To an extent, yeah.  I think I was influenced a lot by what others were doing around me but in the end the blame can only really lie with the one who made the decisions, and that was me.  Peer pressure does present a real challenge though because it really has an effect on a lot of people.

Q. Is there anything you’d do differently now if you were faced with those same situations again?

A. I think mainly I’d just try and be a little more responsible when drinking.  It sounds cliché I know, but it freaks me out
a little now to realise how close a lot of my friends and I got to injuring ourselves when we were drinking so much that we had no idea what we were doing.  Personally I think it’s a lot more fun to just be on the buzz alcohol gives you than to be in a state where you have no idea what your name even is anymore.

Thank-you to our anonymous interviewee for answering these few questions for us, it’s our hope that the sharing of experiences like this will help to provide advice and guidance for future readers and community members.  If you have anything you’d like to share with us anonymously or not; or if you want to share your thoughts on this interview, feel free to comment or send us an email – we’d love to hear from you!

 

Cheers!


Alcohol: Government Advertising

This week, we wanted to showcase a few professional approaches to what we’re trying to achieve here through this blog with some anti-drinking campaign advertisements run by the government.

The Australian Government in particular have been pushing a number of hard-hitting “in your face” ads in the last few years with the hope of making an impact on the numbers of binge-drinkers in the country, particularly those who are of a young age. The ads are aimed at those aged between 15 and 25 years, and they demonstrate the violence, humiliation, and injury that binge-drinking can lead to.

The theme of the campaign is “Don’t turn a night out into a nightmare”. We’re sure you’ve probably seen a number of these ads air over television already, and possibly online or at movie theatres Did they seem like they were effective at promoting their message to you? Do you think they were “in your face” enough to actually have an impact?

 

Here’s one advertisement run by the Australian Government that aired last year. How effective do you think it is? Did it make you care at all watching it, or leave you with any thoughts or feelings afterwards?

Alternatively, we wanted to show you a different approach to an anti-drinking campaign that you may not have seen before. This campaign was run in New Zealand, and takes an entirely different approach with the theme of the ads – instead of scare-tactics, these ads take a more light hearted approach with an effort to incorporate humour into the advertising and message. Do you think the comedic aspect of these ads still manages to get the point across? Take a look:

Did the comedy make this ad more appealing to you? Do you think it still got it’s point across well, or was it too light-hearted to be taken seriously? We’d love to hear your thoughts on these campaigns, and if you’ve seen any ads that you think were effective – please tell us about them. Sometimes media advertising can be the best way to spread a message quickly and extensively, but there’s no point if that message isn’t clear or is being ignored.

 

Lastly, we wanted to leave you with a little bit of fun – here’s a Don’t Turn a Night Out into a Nightmare flash game. In this simple, government-funded game, you choose a character impersonation of yourself and progress along in a board-game-like fashion through a typical “night out” scenario, making choices along the way that can alter how well (or not) your night of partying ends. Will you make responsible choices? Will your night out bring you back home safely after a good time, or will it end in regret? Let us know if your “night out” turned into a nightmare!

 

Until next time,

Cheers!